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Fixing unstable wireless connections.

Get the most out of your wireless connection by reducing the factors that cause wireless problems.

Area of Concern
Solution
Your Internet drops when the phone rings.
If your Internet connection drops when the phone rings make sure your equipment is set-up correctly.
Poor modem placement.
A: Make sure your modem is in a place that has access to circulating air, and is away from anything that produces heat. When electronic components get excessively hot they will not work properly.

B: Finding a place for your modem that's higher up (e.g., bookcase, shelf, upstairs), gets you better coverage. Places that are centrally located are even better.
Too much distance between the router and your device can create an unstable wireless connection.
This table gives you an idea of real world* wireless distances. Keep in mind, every environment* is different.

Standard Theoretical Distance RW* Distance
802.11a 115 ft 55 ft
802.11b 115 ft 55 ft
802.11g 125 ft 62 ft
802.11n 230 ft 88 ft
802.11n 115 ft 55 ft
802.11ac 115 ft 55 ft

*Real world factors affect how far and how fast your Wi-Fi runs. Real world factors include Wi-fi overhead, interference (physical barriers, other Wi-fi networks), your network and how many devices are on your network.

Interference from physical barriers such as brick, walls, water, metal, reflective surfaces, windows and furniture can prevent your Wi-Fi signal from being stable.
A: Make sure your modem is in a place that has access to circulating air, and is away from anything that produces heat. When electronic components get excessively hot they will not work properly.

B: Finding a place for your modem that's higher up (e.g., bookcase, shelf, upstairs), gets you better coverage. Places that are centrally located are even better.

C: Be aware of the follow physical barriers that can wreak havoc on your Wi-Fi connection. Try opening an inner door or moving your modem or wireless device around. It's surprising how much a wall can affect your wireless connection.

Barrier Loss in dB
Dry Wall 3 dB
Hollow Wood Door 4 dB
Brick Walls 6 dB
Concrete 8 dB
Refrigerator 19 dB

*A 3 dB drop is equal to a 50% drop in signal strength.
Interference from other wireless networks is very common. Wi-Fi is an unlicensed band, which means other wireless networks are allowed to interfere with yours.
1: Find the best Wi-Fi channel for your environment. Here are two examples for finding a better Wi-Fi channel. You can use any Wi-Fi analyzer. 2: Change the wireless radio settings (channel, power level and mode) on your modem. Don't have a Wi-Fi analyzer? That's ok, adjust your radio settings, and see if your connection improves.
Interference from other electronics: microwaves, cordless phones (2.4 GHz), cell phones, bluetooth devices, televisions, dimmer switches, fans, fluorescent lights, copy machines, treadmills, wireless surveillance systems, wireless speakers, wireless baby monitors, motion detector lights, garage door openers.
Some electronics like microwaves generate noise on the same frequency as your Wi-Fi. Some TVs have power supplies that generate short range interference affecting your Wi-Fi even while the TV is turned off. If you notice your Internet disconnecting or slowing down while you are using the microware (or another device), try the following:

1: Turning off (and unplug) the device you think maybe causing a problem and test your Internet connection.

2: If the problem goes away while the device is unplugged (but you still need to use the device), create 5 to 10 feet of space between the device and the modem to see if this improves your connection.
Problems with the modem
Sometimes your modem gets confused and needs some help. Try the following: